Smoking car - big issue

2 ? Compression 3 ? Power 4 ? Exhaust The top dead center (TDC) of a piston is the position where it is nearest to the valves; bottom dead center (BDC) is the opposite position where it is furthest from them. A stroke is the

Dodane: 24-08-2016 11:00
Smoking car - big issue reduce smoke Nissan

Diagram showing the operation of a 4-stroke SI engine

4-stroke engines
Main article: 4-stroke engine
Diagram showing the operation of a 4-stroke SI engine. Labels:
1 ? Induction
2 ? Compression
3 ? Power
4 ? Exhaust

The top dead center (TDC) of a piston is the position where it is nearest to the valves; bottom dead center (BDC) is the opposite position where it is furthest from them. A stroke is the movement of a piston from TDC to BDC or vice versa together with the associated process. While an engine is in operation the crankshaft rotates continuously at a nearly constant speed. In a 4-stroke ICE each piston experiences 2 strokes per crankshaft revolution in the following order. Starting the description at TDC, these are:78

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_combustion_engine


Why is the use of public transport is important especially in big cities?

In particular, many major urban centers there is more and more a problem with the huge traffic jams, especially during rush hours, which is why the authorities of many cities persuade motorists to give up to move your own vehicle and elected public means of transport. Although using public transport for sure we are exposed to the crowd on trams or buses, it should be induced to such exchange. True, motoring fans argue that the use of own car is much more comfortable, but we must bear in mind also that choosing the bus instead of the car contribute to fewer exhaust emissions.


Car - what does it mean?

The word "car" is believed to originate from the Latin word carrus or carrum ("wheeled vehicle"), or the Middle English word carre (meaning cart, from Old North French). In turn, these originated from the Gaulish word karros (a Gallic chariot). The Gaulish language was a branch of the Brythoic language which also used the word Karr; the Brythonig language evolved into Welsh (and Gaelic) where 'Car llusg' (a drag cart or sledge) and 'car rhyfel' (war chariot) still survive.1112 It originally referred to any wheeled horse-drawn vehicle, such as a cart, carriage, or wagon.1314 "Motor car" is attested from 1895, and is the usual formal name for cars in British English.3 "Autocar" is a variant that is also attested from 1895, but that is now considered archaic. It literally means "self-propelled car".15 The term "horseless carriage" was used by some to refer to the first cars at the time that they were being built, and is attested from 1895.16

The word "automobile" is a classical compound derived from the Ancient Greek word autós (?????), meaning "self", and the Latin word mobilis, meaning "movable". It entered the English language from French, and was first adopted by the Automobile Club of Great Britain in 1897.17 Over time, the word "automobile" fell out of favour in Britain, and was replaced by "motor car". It remains a chiefly North American usage.18 An abbreviated form, "auto", was formerly a common way to refer to cars in English, but is now considered old-fashioned. The word is still used in some compound formations in American English, like "auto industry" and "auto mechanic".

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car#Etymology



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